Saturday, December 17, 2011

BlackBerry Curve 8310 Most Important Difference

The most important difference between the original Curve plus the RIM BlackBerry Curve 8310 is your addition of GPS. With this attribute, you can use Curve as a handheld navigation device with the help of a location-based service (LBS) as well as navigation software, such as Google Road directions for Mobile. AT&T offers its individual LBS called TeleNav GPS Navigator, such as color maps and text- and voice-guided operating directions, and local search. You can find out more on the add-on service in our full writeup on TeleNav, and be aware that your service costs $9. 99 per thirty day period for unlimited trips or $5. 99 for about 10 trips. Check out the Performance section to view how the Curve fared as a new navigator.

BlackBerry Curve 8310

Other wireless radios on your Curve 8310 include Bluetooth and BORDER. Bluetooth allows you to connect for you to wireless headsets, Bluetooth stereo headsets, along with hands-free kits. In addition, there's support for object exchange and dial-up networking so that you can use the device as a wireless modem for ones laptop. Unlike T-Mobile's Curve, however, this version has no integrated Wi-Fi, so you'll have to browse the web via AT&T's EDGE network. As we've said more often than not before, we know EDGE isn't that will slow, but after using other 3G-enabled telephones, the EDGE data transfer speeds tested our patience a lttle bit.

BlackBerry Curve 8310

As for voice features, the Curve is often a quad-band world phone and offers a new speakerphone, voice-activated dialing, smart dialing, seminar calling, and speed dial. The phone features advanced audio technology that's meant to cancel out background noise and echoes all of which will automatically increase the volume when you're in a very noisy environment. In addition, the touch screen phone supports AT&T's push-to-talk service, allowing that you instantly see the availability of your current contacts before calling them and create individual or group PTT calls. PTT strategies start at $9. 99 per thirty day period. The BlackBerry 8310's phonebook is limited only with the available memory--the SIM card holds a different 250 contacts--with room in each entry for eight numbers, e-mail addresses, work and home details, job title, and more. For harasser ID purposes, you can assign a photograph to a contact as well a bunch category--business or personal--or one of fortyfive polyphonic ringtones. The Curve also sustains MP3 and MIDI ringtones.

BlackBerry Curve 8310

And what is actually a BlackBerry without e-mail? Like various other models, the Curve 8310 is works with your company's BlackBerry Enterprise server using support for Microsoft Exchange, IBM Lotus Domino, or Novell GroupWise to deliver corporate e-mail instantly. In total, the device can support possibly 10 accounts, including POP3 or IMAP4 e-mail records, and there is an e-mail wizard on the device to help you through the setup process. The recently added spell-check feature look for any spelling errors in your messages before they're sent and give alternatives to misspelled words. And while it's intended for e-mails and memos, unfortunately it's unavailable for text messages. An attachment viewer is usually onboard to open popular file formats including Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Corel WordPerfect, Ebooks, JPEG, GIF, and more, and we had the ability to receive and open all files. Various other messaging options include text, multimedia, along with instant messaging, although the latter is fixed to the proprietary BlackBerry Messenger client.