Wednesday, November 23, 2011

HTC Titan Mango Windows Phone

The HTC Titan's graphical user interface is the same Windows Phone one you'll receive on any competing device working the OS. The only differentiating thing could be the HTC green preloaded as a layout color. The interface is very clear and simple - it's composed of live tiles that show information just like the current date, calendar events, overlooked calls, unread emails and a lot more, all without the need to open up some of the applications.

Pushing the unlock option reveals the lock screen, which displays the existing time and date and displays calendar events, emails and overlooked calls. The background of the lock screen may be changed from either the settings menu or from your picture gallery.

Swiping the lock screen up unlocks the unit and reveals the live-tile Metro graphical user interface. It's a very fluid top to bottom grid of Live tiles that shows 1 or 2 tiles organized in bricked type. Each of these can be reorganized where ever order you like and you may place almost anything in the particular grid by holding your little finger over it and selecting the Pin to start out option, titan design.

The Live tiles, the essential building blocks of the Commence screen of Windows Phone are already revamped. Now they are quicker and provide more info. For example, the Pictures tile shows an animated slideshow of one's images. The Group tile (Groups can be a new feature to boot) databases friend updates. The application list has exploded a virtual Search button, helping to make finding apps easier for people that have many apps installed.

One with the main novelties brought by the newest WP build - 7. 5 Mango : is multitasking. It still just isn't true multitasking; things are getting done the iOS way. Apps not inside the foreground are suspended, but the OS has approaches to take over and carry out the job for them.

We only worry that logic can be too restrictive for a few apps, but we'll see just how things pan out. Of training course, there will be a transitional period of time when some apps will support multitasking among others won't. We've been there with all the iOS, when it first still left the realm of single-tasking – it’s not necessarily that bad.

Anyway, to switch between apps you press and support the Back key (that's proper, the Back key, not the particular Windows key). The app switcher itself looks just like that of Symbian or WebOS: thumbnail snapshots with the apps, ordered chronologically left to be able to right.

You can scroll the list horizontally to choose an app and a tap provides you back to exactly the method that you left it. Usually, the previous 5-6 apps are here. You can not "kill" any of those programs, this is more of a brief history of the recently used programs.

Eventually, as you open a lot more apps, the old ones start to drop out from the list. Once an app is fully gone, you have to launch it again the old-fashioned way, which has the drawback of starting it over right from the start. Finally apps with active backdrop tasks (e. g. streaming online radio) help keep on working.

Multitasking can be disabled from your settings to save battery. There you'll also find a listing of all installed apps that help multitasking.

Opening the settings food selection reveals two sets of alternatives - system and applications. System covers every one of the settings you can think regarding like sounds, color theme, Wi-Fi, Wireless, Accounts, etc. The Applications settings lets you configure individual settings for each app you might have installed on the device - individuals hub, Phone, Maps and a lot more.

Windows Phone 7. 5 may be controlled through voice only - it is possible to dictate a text, have the device read out the reply, you can initiate searches etc. Other OSes are doing that too (*cough*Android*cough*) but voice commands certainly are a big part of iOS (plus a loudly touted one at in which), so WP7. 5 can brag regarding it too.

The People hub coming from Windows Phone 7 was remarkable, but the 7. 5 update helps it be absolutely brilliant. Part of that is because of the better social network help, complete with Twitter and LinkedIn.

The rest is pretty quite similar. You still get the clever means of jumping to contacts starting using a specific letter, the What's new tab in which aggregates status updates from all contacts as well as the Recent tab, which lists simply recently viewed contacts.

And deeper social media support makes things even far better. When viewing a contact's report, you get everything from contact, text, send email, write about wall, mention on Twitter etc. The contact photo, along with all the latest status update, are visible at the top.

The What's new tab works like its namesake inside the People hub, but only shows updates from your specific contact. Pictures is the location where the contact's Facebook albums are.

One of the most interesting addition is the fresh History tab. The complete history of exchange using a contact is in one spot listed by day. Everything but status updates is right here - calls, texts (actually threads from your Messaging hub) and email messages.

The HTC Titan's user interface could be the same Windows Phone one you'll receive on any competing device working the OS. The only differentiating thing could be the HTC green preloaded as a layout color. The interface is very clear and simple - it's composed of live tiles that show information just like the current date, calendar events, overlooked calls, unread emails and a lot more, all without the need to open up some of the applications.

Pushing the unlock option reveals the lock screen, which displays the existing time and date and displays calendar events, emails and overlooked calls. The background of the lock screen may be changed from either the settings menu or from your picture gallery.

Swiping the lockscreen up unlocks the unit and reveals the live-tile Metro graphical user interface. It's a very fluid top to bottom grid of Live tiles that shows 1 or 2 tiles organized in bricked type. Each of these can be reorganized where ever order you like and you may place almost anything in the particular grid by holding your little finger over it and selecting the Pin to start out option.

The Live tiles, the essential building blocks of the Commence screen of Windows Phone are already revamped. Now they are quicker and provide more info. For example, the Pictures tile shows an animated slideshow of one's images. The Group tile (Groups can be a new feature to boot) databases friend updates. The application list has exploded a virtual Search button, helping to make finding apps easier for people that have many apps installed.

To acquire things going, here's a video demonstrating HTC Titan doing his thing.

One of the main novelties brought from the latest WP build - 7. 5 Mango : is multitasking. It still just isn't true multitasking; things are getting done the iOS way. Apps not inside the foreground are suspended, but the OS has approaches to take over and carry out the job for them.

We only worry that logic can be too restrictive for a few apps, but we'll see just how things pan out. Of training course, there will be a transitional period of time when some apps will support multitasking among others won't. We've been there with all the iOS, when it first still left the realm of single-tasking – it’s not necessarily that bad.

Anyway, to switch between apps you press and support the Back key (that's proper, the Back key, not the particular Windows key). The app switcher itself looks just like that of Symbian or WebOS: thumbnail snapshots with the apps, ordered chronologically left to be able to right.

You can scroll the list horizontally to choose an app and a tap provides you back to exactly the method that you left it. Usually, the previous 5-6 apps are here. You can not "kill" any of those programs, this is more of a brief history of the recently used programs.

Eventually, as you open a lot more apps, the old ones start to drop out from the list. Once an app is fully gone, you have to launch it again the old-fashioned way, which has the drawback of starting it over right from the start. Finally apps with active backdrop tasks (e. g. streaming online radio) help keep on working.

Multitasking can be disabled from your settings to save battery. There you'll also find a listing of all installed apps that help multitasking.

Opening the settings food selection reveals two sets of alternatives - system and applications. System covers every one of the settings you can think regarding like sounds, color theme, Wi-Fi, Wireless, Accounts, etc. The Applications settings lets you configure individual settings for each app you might have installed on the device - individuals hub, Phone, Maps and a lot more.


Windows Phone 7. 5 may be controlled through voice only - it is possible to dictate a text, have the device read out the reply, you can initiate searches etc. Other OSes are doing that too (*cough*Android*cough*) but voice commands certainly are a big part of iOS (plus a loudly touted one at in which), so WP7. 5 can brag regarding it too.


The People hub coming from Windows Phone 7 was remarkable, but the 7. 5 update helps it be absolutely brilliant. Part of that is because of the better social network help, complete with Twitter and LinkedIn.

The rest is pretty quite similar. You still get the clever means of jumping to contacts starting using a specific letter, the What's new tab in which aggregates status updates from all contacts as well as the Recent tab, which lists simply recently viewed contacts.

And deeper social media support makes things even far better. When viewing a contact's report, you get everything from contact, text, send email, write about wall, mention on Twitter etc. The contact photo, along with all the latest status update, are visible at the top.

The What's new tab works like its namesake inside the People hub, but only shows updates from your specific contact. Pictures is the location where the contact's Facebook albums are.

One of the most interesting addition is the fresh History tab. The complete history of exchange using a contact is in one spot listed by day. Everything but status updates is right here - calls, texts (actually threads from your Messaging hub) and email messages.

One of the new top features of the hub is Groups, a handy solution to organize your contacts, with "text everyone" and also "email everyone" features. All the status updates from your grouped contacts are pulled in from other various social networks, and you access their online photo albums also.

The Me card is your own personal profile. From here you can easily post status updates, set talk status, check into locations (there is certainly more location goodness coming about later). You can also change your profile picture (limited to Facebook and Live though, not necessarily Twitter).

Another tab inside the Me card lets you see notifications (e. g. Twitting mentions) and, finally, What's new allows you to view your own status revisions.

2 comments:

jay paul said...

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jay paul said...

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